AN IMPORTANT JEWELED AND ENAMELED GOLD AND AGATE SIGNET RING

AN IMPORTANT JEWELED AND ENAMELED GOLD AND AGATE SIGNET RING Tatiana Nikolaevna Romanowa

BY FABERGÉ, PETROGRAD, CIRCA 1915

AN IMPORTANT JEWELED AND ENAMELED GOLD AND AGATE SIGNET RING
BY FABERGÉ, PETROGRAD, CIRCA 1915,


Of typical form, with an oval agate matrix engraved with the cypher of Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna beneath an Imperial crown, the border enameled with white diamond pattern on a royal blue ground, apparently unmarked

Provenance

Purchased by Empress Alexandra Feodorovna (1872-1918) from Fabergé’s Petrograd branch on March 18, 1915 for 80 roubles.

Price realised

USD 47,500

Estimate

USD 20,000 - USD 30,000

Tatjana Nikolajewna Romanowa

Tatjana Nikolajewna Romanowa

Tatjana Nikolajewna Romanowa

Grand Duchess Tatjana Nikolajewna of Russia (Tatjana Nikolajewna Romanowa; russischТатьяна Николаевна Романова; * 29. Maijul./ 10. Juni 1897 in Zarskoje Selo; † 17. Juli1918 near Jekaterinburg) was the second daughter of Nicholas II of Russia and Alexandra Fjodorowna, formerly Alix of Hessen-Darmstadt.

Childhood and adolescence

Tatyana Nikolayevna received her first name after the figure of Tatyana from Alexander Pushkin's work Eugene Onegin, and like her older sister Olga, she was a good student. She enjoyed handicrafts, playing the piano and poetry. Like her mother, she was strongly religious and shared her interest in fashion. 1913 she fell ill with typhoid fever after drinking orangeade made with unclean water and hovered between life and death for weeks. To recover, the family traveled for an extended stay to their summer residence, the Livadia Palace in Crimea.

Tatyana was the honorary chairman of a committee named after her to support the war-affected. During the First World War, like her mother and sister Olga, she worked as a nurse for the Russian Red Cross, caring for wounded soldiers in hospitals. In 1914 she nursed the wounded young officer Dimitri Malama, with whom she developed a rapturous love affair. After he gave her a small French bulldog, which she called Ortipo, his contact with the Romanov family intensified and he visited them again in 1916. The Czar and the Czarina already saw in him a son-in-law. Malama fell in 1919 on the side of the white troops in the Russian Civil War.

Imprisonment and death

As a result of the February Revolution in 1917 and later the October Revolution, the entire tsar family was captured and held for about a year. During the time of captivity Tatyana lost a lot of weight. On the night of 17 July 1918 she was shot with her family in the Ipatiev House in Ekaterinburgerschossen. She turned 21 years old.

Commemoration

In August 2000 she and her family were canonized by the Russian Orthodox Church.


Grand Duchess Tatiana 17th Century Russian Cross Necklace

Grand Duchess Tatiana 17 Th Century Russian Cross Necklace

This unique 17th century Russian brass cross necklace, which belonged to Grand Duchess Tatiana (1897-1918), the second daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, was brought to America and sold by Armand Hammer in 1933.  

Almost certainly, this cross was given to Tatiana during one of her pilgrimages. It is very likely that the cross initially belonged to a venerated monk or a priest, possibly a canonized saint of the Russian Orthodox Church.

Likely, the original 17th century chain was much longer and was shortened to fit Tatiana’s neck. The chain has a gold clasp (made of Russian rose gold) from the early 1900s. All of these indicate that, apparently, the necklace had been worn by Tatiana.

Armand Hammer (1898-1990), an American entrepreneur, started doing business in the Soviet Russia in 1921 and stayed there until 1930. He met with Lenin in person and was granted a permission to develop the Lena river gold mines in Siberia. In the late 1920s, under the Stalin’s regime, Hammer’s concession in the gold mines was revoked. As a compensation, Stalin allowed him to purchase almost the entire content of the Alexander Palace, the last residence of the Russian Tsar Nicholas II, which mostly consisted of personal items of the Romanovs. Belongings of the Imperial family were sold in America in the 1930s at the Hammer gallery in New York, as well as at the department stores, such as Lord and Taylor.

The cross necklace comes with the original parchment receipt of the Hammer gallery at Lord and Taylor on Fifth avenue in NYC, as well as with its original retail box.

Several years ago, we were fortunate to have another 17th century cross, which belonged to Grand Duchess Anastasia, the youngest daughter of Nicholas II. That cross also had a Hammer gallery provenance.

The cross pendant measures 54 x 36 mm (2 1/8 x 1 7/16 in.)

Total length of the chains 40 cm (16 in.)

Seen at Romanov Russia